Under the Castro dictatorship, the death tally in Cuba continues to rise

No amount of “normalization” or willful blindness will bring back those who have been murdered by Cuba’s apartheid dictatorship or heal the wounds and scars of its victims. For two years U.S. policy has coddled and supported the brutally repressive Castro regime and all the Cuban people have gotten out of it is more misery, more pain, and more death.

Cuba Archive’s president Maria Werlau in a letter to the editors of The Wall Street Journal:

Continuing Tally of Death Under Cuba’s Dictatorship

Despite more than two years of “normalization” with the U.S., “Cuba is the same totalitarian hellhole that it has been for the past 58 years.”

raul castro wsj

Mary Anastasia O’Grady (“Cuba Kills Another Dissident,” Americas, March 6) is right to note that despite more than two years of “normalization” with the U.S., “Cuba is the same totalitarian hellhole that it has been for the past 58 years.” The high cost in lives of the Castro dictatorship continues under Raúl Castro, who became dictator-in-chief in July 2006, when his late brother Fidel fell ill. Since then, our nonprofit project CubaArchive.org has been able to document 209 deaths and disappearances attributed to the Cuban state, a third occurring since 2012, when “normalization” talks officially began with the Obama administration.

This sad tally includes two forced disappearances of political opponents, 35 presumed extrajudicial killings (including two of Cuba’s leading dissidents and another nine members of peaceful opposition groups), six deaths from hunger strikes and 161 deaths in prison from denial of medical care and alleged or induced suicides. The number of actual victims is presumed to be many times higher, but collecting this information is very difficult in totalitarian Cuba. The highest toll is reportedly among young Afro-Cuban men dying in prison in large numbers, punished for “crimes” such as being unemployed or killing a cow to eat.

Maria C. Werlau
Executive Director
Cuba Archive

Coral Gables, Fla.

Comments

comments

Leave a Comment